[Video] Music Tech Investors and Incubators — Investing in the LA Music Tech Scenes

Last month I had the pleasure of curating and moderating the panel “Music Tech Investors and Incubators — Investing in the LA Music Tech Scenes” at the Amplifying Music in Our Los Angeles conference produced by the UCLA Center for Music Innovation.

My panelists included representatives of investors, accelerators and co-working communities in Los Angeles that focus on music industry entrepreneurship including Techstars Music, Capitol Music Group’s Capitol360 and gBeta Music Tech Accelerator, and The Rattle LA, as well as more open format accelerators including Expert Dojo and Startup UCLA & Blackstone Launch Pad.

In this <60 minutes discussion, we covered plenty of information that any founder of a music startup would want to know about where and how to seek resources to develop, launch, or grow a music venture in Los Angeles.

Bios of my speakers can be found below the video of the panel.

 

 

  • Moderator: Dae Bogan, Founder, TuneRegistry; Lecturer, UCLA Alpert
    Dae Bogan is a music rights executive, serial entrepreneur and educator with over a decade of experience in the music industry. He is the founder and CEO of TuneRegistry, which develops music rights administration software and solutions for small and medium-sized music rightsholders. He also offers music rights, business, and technology consulting through his firm, Rights Department. Dae also teaches the Music Industry Entrepreneurship course at UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music and was an Innovation Fellow at the UCLA Center for Music Innovation. Previously, Dae owned and operated an independent record company (Loft24 Records), a music publishing company (Loft24 Publishing), and an artist management company (Renaissance Artist Management) until 2012 when he founded an in-store independent music video network (Maven Promo), which was later acquired by EMPIRE Distribution in 2017. Dae also founded the world’s first aggregator and search engine of unclaimed music royalties (RoyaltyClaim), which was acquired by HAAWK in 2017.

 

  • Jonathan Wallace, Investment Director, Expert Dojo
    Jonathan Wallace joined Expert Dojo upon its inception as an investment analyst. Over the course of the next 3 years he established relationships with some of the largest venture capital funds in the world and helped dozens of startups raise investment. Jonathan is now the investment director for Expert Dojo and oversees all follow on investments. Expert Dojo has over 30 companies in its portfolio after investing for the last 12 months. 

 

  • Josh Remsberg, VP, Business Development, Capitol Music Group
    Josh Remsberg is Vice President of Business Development at Capitol Music Group. At Capitol, he oversees the Capitol360 Innovation Center, and is focused on finding & developing new revenue opportunities to exploit and extract value from CMG’s copyrights, content, brand assets, and artists. Josh also leads the eCommerce, CRM, audience ownership and gaming strategies for the label group.

 

  • Leah Nanni, Venture Coach and Outreach Coord., Startup UCLA & Blackstone Launch Pad
    Leah is a business owner and Venture Consultant at Startup UCLA, where she helps Bruins become confident and competent entrepreneurs. She also co-leads Startup UCLA’s outreach and inclusion efforts with the goal of reaching entrepreneurs at any stage, in any industry, and from any background and any area of study. Leah holds a M.S. in Social Entrepreneurship and a Master of Social Work, and she brings more than 9 years of business ownership experience to the UCLA and greater Los Angeles communities. 

 

  • Jen Hall, Director, TechStars Music
    Jen Hall is a music industry veteran having worked in management with major artists and at record labels over the past 15+ years. Jen joined Techstars with the inception of the Techstars Music program in 2016. Techstars Music has just finished its 3rd program. Alumni companies from the Techstars Music 2017 and 2018 class have gone on to raise over 50 million dollars in follow on capital.

 

  • Michael Frick, Advisor/Executive Producer, The Rattle, LA
    Michael Frick is a creative solutions innovator with the ability to build consensus among disparate stakeholders. His expertise in music driven strategies for brands, motion pictures, television and digital entertainment has seen him partner with numerous major global brands, agencies, networks and studios. As advisor to the Rattle he is assisting with the launch of the UK-based collective in Los Angeles, CA.

Introduction to Music Royalties Forensics (North America – USA & CAN)

Introduction to Music Royalties Forensics (North America)

Price: $90
Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes
Order: Click here to purchase.

 

Course Overview

Every day, millions of music streams, downloads, digital transmissions, public performances, and broadcasts generate tens of thousands of dollars in unclaimed royalties. To date, the estimated pool of unclaimed royalties exceeds $2 billion.

These royalties are often due to independent music creators, heirs and beneficiaries, and legacy artists. After a period of time, these unclaimed royalties accrue in escrow accounts around the world only to be disbursed by market share to the major labels and publishers leaving the indies, to which much of the money belongs, underrepresented and unaccounted to. Music royalties forensics is the process of searching for, identifying, and claiming these royalties. This course is an introduction to the art and science of finding and unlocking unclaimed royalties.

Your instructor, Dae Bogan, is a music rights and royalties tech entrepreneur (original founder of music rights administration platform, TuneRegistry, and the world’s first search engine of unclaimed royalties and music licenses, RoyaltyClaim), music creators’ rights advocate, and lecturer of music industry entrepreneurship at UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music. He has written about black box royalties extensively on his blog DaeBoganMusic.com. He has helped hundreds of music creators and rights-holders find and unlock hundreds of thousands of dollars in unpaid music royalties from around the world. And his research on the state of unclaimed music royalties was used by US Congressional Budget Office in its analysis of the Music Modernization Act of 2018.

 

Learning Objectives

  1. What are your rights, entitlements, and income participations as a music creator and/or rights-holder?
  2. What are the most common royalty streams generated from a variety of music usage types and where do those royalties flow?
  3. How are music royalties allocated and distributed by music rights organizations?
  4. What are niche funds and sub-funds that often generate unmatched so-called “black box” royalties and how do you check for your records?
  5. How to track music usage to leverage usage and detection reports to reconcile or audit royalty statements?
  6. What are some tools and resources to help you search for, identify, and claim unclaimed royalties and music licenses?
  7. What are the requirements to properly setup to be accounted to and paid royalties from previously unaffiliated sources going forward?
  8. What are some tips for managing your music rights affiliations?
  9. What are some tips for preparing your music rights and royalties for beneficiaries?

Music Industry Entrepreneurship Masterclass

Music Industry Entrepreneurship Masterclass

Price: $190
Duration: 4 hours (with breaks)
Order: Click here to purchase.

Course Overview

From digital-first record labels and social music apps to AR/VR music experiences and blockchain-based music streaming startups, entrepreneurs have been disrupting and innovating across the music industry since the launch of Napster in the early 2000’s.

In this masterclass, you will learn to apply principles of entrepreneurship and fundamental business strategies to the music industry in ways that will make you a stronger asset within a team or a more strategic music creator or entrepreneur.

Learning Objectives

  1. How to form quality ideas using design thinking techniques in the ideation process.
  2. Understanding the intellectual property implications of your creations, products and services in the music industry.
  3. How to utilize market research and quantification methodology to vet ideas and quantify opportunity in the music industry before you invest your time and resources.
  4. How to throw away your 30 page business plan and instead develop an actionable business model that centers around product-market fit.
  5. How to launch with a lean go-to-market strategy.
  6. How to develop basic digital marketing funnels.
  7. How to get out of your own way by applying data-driven strategies to prioritize your monetizable skills. (Key insight for music creators seeking to monetize their skills while building a career as a performer.)
  8. How to keep yourself motivated by identifying and repeating your most powerful motivators.
  9. How to attract co-founders and build teams on a budget.
  10. How to build company culture in small or remote teams.

Live Online Workshop: Introduction to Music Royalties Forensics (May 18th and May 19th)

Workshop Flier

About Me: I am a music rights and royalties tech entrepreneur (original founder of music rights administration platform, TuneRegistry, and the world’s first search engine of unclaimed royalties and music licenses, RoyaltyClaim), music creators’ rights advocate, and lecturer of music industry entrepreneurship at UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music. I have helped hundreds of music creators and rightsholders find and unlock hundreds of thousands of dollars in unpaid music royalties from around the world. And my research on the state of unclaimed music royalties was used by US Congressional Budget Office in its analysis of the Music Modernization Act of 2018.

 

9 Questions – 90 Minutes – $90

The 9 questions this workshop will answer:

  1. What are your rights, entitlements, and income participations as a music creator and/or rights-holder?
  2. What are the most common royalty streams generated from a variety of music usage types and where do those royalties flow?
  3. How are music royalties allocated and distributed by music rights organizations?
  4. What are niche funds and sub-funds that often generate unmatched so-called “black box” royalties and how do you check for your records?
  5. How to track music usage to leverage usage and detection reports to reconcile or audit royalty statements?
  6. What are some tools and resources to help you search for, identify, and claim unclaimed royalties and music licenses?
  7. What are the requirements to properly setup to be accounted to and paid royalties from previously unaffiliated sources going forward?
  8. What are some tips for managing your music rights affiliations?
  9. What are some tips for preparing your music rights and royalties for beneficiaries?

REGISTER

Register for Sat. May 18th @ 9am PST

Register for Sun. May 19th @ 9am PST

Register for Mon. May 20th @ 9am PST

If you can’t make either dates, register anyway to receive the full replay video.

Upcoming Music Industry Events

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I might lose my voice over the next few weeks as I join many of you fine people attending and participating in a number of upcoming music industry conferences.
 
If any of the following sparks your interest, I’d be delighted to see your face in these space:
4/27, 4/27, 4/30 – Music Industry Entrepreneurship Masterclass (Online)
Not a conference, but informational nonetheless. Enrollment is now open until 4/25 for my live online masterclass, with 3 sessions available to choose from each day on 4/27, 4/28, and 4/30. This masterclass is an “essentials” version of my Billboard-recognized Music Industry Entrepreneurship course, which I develop and teach at the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music. (Attend)
05/03 – ASCAP “I Create Music” Expo (Los Angeles)
I will moderate the panel, “Learn To Earn: New Royalty Opportunities For Musicians, Vocalists, Producers and Engineers,” with Richard James Burgess (A2IM), Maureen Droney (The Recording Academy), Dan Navarro (National Recording Artist), and Stefanie Taub (AFM & SAG-AFTRA Intellectual Property Rights Distribution Fund) who will be discussing new royalty opportunities for music creators. (Attend)
05/07 – Music Biz 2019 (Nashville)
Join me in discussion with Warner Music Group’s Chief Innovation Officer, Scott Cohen, on the topic “Music 2020: The Next Era of Innovation in the Music Industry.” (Attend)
05/15 – Amplify Music in Our Los Angeles (UCLA)
I will moderate the panel, “Music Tech Investors and Incubators — Investing in the LA Music Tech Scenes” with Josh Remsberg (Capitol Music Group’s Capitol360 & gBeta Music Tech), Jen Hall (Techstars Music), Jonathan Wallace (Expert Dojo), Michael Frick (The Rattle LA), and Leah Nanni (Startup UCLA & Blackstone LaunchPad) who will be discussing empowering and investing in tech entrepreneurs in the music industry in Los Angeles. (Attend)

Dae Bogan To Moderate Panel On Los Angeles Music Startup Scene With Capitol360, Techstars Music, Expert DOJO, The Rattle LA, And Startup UCLA / Blackstone Launch Pad At UCLA’s Amplifying Music In Our Los Angeles Conference On| May 15th, 2019

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Amplifying Music in Our Los Angeles

A Conference Amplifying and Connecting the Music Scenes of Los Angeles

Host: Center for Music Innovation at UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music

Location: Charles E. Young Research Library Auditorium, UCLA North Campus

Time: 9 am – 4:30 pm

Date: Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Cost: Free for Registered Attendees


How can we support Los Angeles’ music scene(s) and work together to continue to create something robust, diverse, and dynamic in this changing era?

This day-long conference expands the conversation of how Los Angeles can grow and connect/collaborate around its diverse music scenes. If other cities are challenged by gentrification in having vibrant live music scenes, (a) why is Los Angeles seeming to be growing, despite these difficulties and (b) how we we enhance and amplify this growth?

Background

This Conference is the second in a series of events that UCLA Center for Music Innovation is holding with this Future of Music in LA focus across 2019 across LA, so we welcome you to be involved in those programs as well.

On February 6th, the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs held a half-day Symposium as part of its February COMPOSE LA series of events. With partners that included UCLA’s Center for Music Innovation, they brought together different voices across Los Angeles and music to talk about the future of Music in Los Angeles.

Los Angeles is a complex environment. From panels and provocations, we came up with many things that weren’t right within the overall ecosystems in terms of policy, permitting, and procedures. We also explored our very vibrant environment that seems to be growing — despite the systemic challenges.

The Invitation

We invite the community gather again on May 15th at UCLA to both expand the conversation and to add new voices into the mix. We’re going to include people joining us from video conference from other cities and locations. We’re going to include new parties — and parties with different perspectives. And we’re going to include roundtable conversations, where the conversation will come out into and with the audience.

We invite you to join us for this community event at the Charles Young Research Library at the UCLA campus. The event will be free, along with the support from our community and marketing sponsors.

The Schedule

Sessions and the full schedule will be posted mid-April.

 

FREE REGISTRATION (INCLUDING ONLINE STREAMING OF CONFERENCE)

90% Of Music Startups Fail – Improve Your Chances – Enroll In ‘Music Industry Entrepreneurship Masterclass’​

Hi there,

Did you know that 90% of startups fail and while there may be 16 reasons why music startups fail in particular, failure still sucks for the hundreds of music startup founders who failed; especially those who could have gotten it right had they consulted with a music industry entrepreneurship coach.

My name is Dae Bogan and I am a 3x exited serial music industry entrepreneur; a Lecturer, Music Industry at UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music where I develop and teach “Music Industry Entrepreneurship,” which was recognized by Billboard on its list of “The 15 Best Music Business Schools In 2017;” and I am the founder and executive consultant of music startup consultancy, Rights Department, where I’ve helped over 40 founders from around the world develop, launch, scale, pivot, or exit their startups in the music and digital media industries.

Next weekend, for the first time ever, I will be teaching a live online Music Industry Entrepreneurship Masterclass with 9 different sessions to choose from on April 27th, 28th, and 39th. Enrollment starts at less than the price of a one hour coaching session and if you can’t make it, by registering, you will still receive a full recording of the masterclass plus any additional benefits based on your enrollment package.

WATCH A FREE INFORMATION SESSION VIDEO

One of my biggest issues as an artist manager is deciding which opportunities are most lucrative for my clients. Dae’s strategies around organization help you identify which skills you should prioritize in order to drive success for yourself or your team. With Dae’s insight, I have become more efficient and realistic in my pursuit of new ventures, with both short term and long terms goals in mind. — Ryan MacDonald, Entrepreneur

Not For You?

If you do not believe the masterclass applies to you, but you know an entrepreneur — in any industry — who may be interested in learning entrepreneurial skills and fundamental business strategies, please send them the information.

10 Income Streams For A Music Producer

A breakdown of income you could earn by producing one hit (or at least, viral) record.

Production Icome

1. Production fee for your creative input in producing the track.
2. Recording Engineer fee for performing recording engineer duties in the studio.
3. Mixing Engineer fee for mixing the track.
4. Mastering Engineer fee for mastering the track.

(1-4 could be embodied all in one fee, or you could line item it in your contract and/or invoice.)

Master Income

5. Income share in the master sales, downloads, streams, often referred to as “points on the record.”
6. If you add background vocals and/or live instrumentation to the production, while you may not earn a session musician fee, you are still entitled to receive all or a portion of the non-featured performer share of statutory master royalties for US non-interactive streams, or so-called “digital radio royalties.” To get this, make sure that you are credited not only as a Producer but also as a background vocalist or musician for whatever instrument you played. These royalties in the US are paid out by the AFM & SAG-AFTRA Intellectual Property Rights Distribution Fund. These funds do not reduce the featured artist’s neighboring rights (US = digital radio) income. It is completely separate from the featured performer share of income and non-negotiable by that featured performer. If you don’t claim it, you still earn it but you leave it on the table!
7. Thanks to the passing of the Music Modernization Act, which became law on October 11th, 2018, and the inclusion of the Allocation for Music Producers Act (AMP Act), studio professionals such as producers and engineers have a legal and permanent right to directly collect non-interactive, digital royalties agreed through a letter of direction with the featured artist from SoundExchange. Join the Creative Affiliates Program at SoundExchange and submit your letters of direction.
8. A producer’s share of international neighboring rights royalties in several territories where recordings that you produce are performed on broadcast radio and TV.

Publishing Income

9. If you composed the melody or co-authored the lyrics, you should be considered a Writer on the musical work and be entitled to receive writer-share of publishing income (performance royalties, mechanical royalties, synchronization royalties).
10. If you composed the melody or co-authored the lyrics, as a Writer on the musical work, you are entitled to receive or assign the publisher-share of publishing income (performance royalties, mechanical royalties, synchronization royalties).

In conclusion, if you’re a music producer, make sure that you understand all of the income streams associated with the work that you put in on a recording AND your legal entitlements under copyright law and music publishing industry customs. Also, join the Recording Academy / GRAMMYs Producers & Engineers Wing.

Want to learn more? Download my FREE ebook “The DIY Musician’s Starter Guide To Being Your Own Label And Publisher.”

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