Breaking: Jammber Acquires TuneRegistry

jammber tuneregistry music business worldwide

 

I am super excited about this!

I’ve been a fan of Marcus and Jammber, and they of me/TuneRegistry, since I first learned of Jammber. Over the last few years, TuneRegistry has been empowering thousands of songwriters, artists, and publishers while Jammber has been empowering producers, engineers, studios and labels. By bringing our expertise and resources together, we believe to have established the first economical end-to-end music business platform for music creations and workflow management, rights administration, and royalty processing for all music creators and rights-holders.

In the coming months, we will be working to integrate TuneRegistry into the Jammber product suite as well as beefing up the Los Angeles-based music rights administration department under my direction as Jammber’s Senior Vice President, Global Music Rights. I look forward to continuing to empower music creators and rights-holders with effective tools and resources to self-administer their catalogs via Jammber’s suite of products.

Here’s a few press links:
 

The Cost of Excuses

I wish there was a device that counted how many excuses we made in a day, a week, a month, and a year and could calculate the cost of opportunities lost.

“I can’t”.

“Next time.”

“I want to, but…”

“It’s too difficult.”

“I will get around to it after…”

“I’m not like you. We’re just different.”

How much time do we lose in our lives telling ourselves that we can’t achieve something? That we’re not good enough? We’re not smart enough? We don’t know where or how to start, so why even bother?

If we add that time up it is probably enough time to accomplish something small, then something medium, then something big, then something life-changing.

I remember when I told myself that I didn’t have time or didn’t need to (because I enjoyed where I was at in my career) go to graduate school.

Then, I was abruptly laid off of my $65k per year job.

I decided to take the time to go back to graduate school and I found a nights and weekends program at CSUN Music Industry Administration that fit my schedule.

That was a life-changing decision.

As a result, I had the availability and took an opportunity to teach at a college; and now I develop and teach a Billboard-recognized course at UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music.

As a result, I took a music publishing and copyright administration class taught by Steve Winogradsky, which strengthen my interest in music rights, which evolved into a research-fueled obsession with conceptualizing strategies and solutions to a broken and seemingly unfair system, which became my area of expertise, which changed the focus of my profession as a music industry professional, and which shaped my achievements as a serial entrepreneur to the point that I’ve sold nearly $2M of my ideas in this space.

As a result, I’ve advanced my role as an executive and increased my pre-graduate school salary to post-graduate school salary by 115%.

As a result, I’ve been able to financially gift my family, claw myself out of debt, and afford certain life experiences.

As a result, I look at excuses differently now. I look at the cost of excuses differently now.

We can measure our achievements, but can we measure opportunities lost? The cost of putting it aside one more day?

How much will one of your excuses from this morning cost you?

Set Goals Or Struggle

I honestly believe that some people are so comfortable with struggling that they refuse to make uncomfortable changes in their lives that would see their outcomes improve in the future. It’s a “chasing immediate results” mindset that encourages them to think about and talk about how a better future could look; all the while simultaneously taking no actions that create long-term and lasting changes.

What is your 5 year goal?

What are your 2nd, 3rd and 4th year milestones?

What is your 12 month plan?

If you took stock of where you are today compared to where you were 5 years ago and have little to no measurable net improvement in income, wealth, professional or academic achievement, global life experiences, health and fitness, or relationship status (I don’t mean just single or taken, but rather does the new or existing relationship (or lack thereof) make you feel happier, more secure, better, more loved than this time 5 years ago?); then you need to think about breaking the cycle and making real changes.

Get used to doing things in phases, whereas a phase could be several months or years, and stop thinking in terms of quick and immediate results. Those generally prove not to be long-lasting.

I’ve completely changed my life outcomes by applying the above to myself. You can too.

Fall Upcoming Music Industry Conferences and Networking in Greater Los Angeles

SCMIP Music Industry Happy Hour 15

SoCal Music Industry Professionals x Artist Managers Connect
Music Industry Happy Hour (15th Edition)
An evening of mingling and networking with musicians, songwriters, producers, and music industry professionals from across Southern California hosted by Dae Bogan.
Thursday, September 26th | 6pm to 9pm | 21 and over
at Sassafras Saloon, 1233 Vine Street, Los Angeles, CA 90038

Fall Upcoming Music Industry Conferences and Networking in Greater Los Angeles
*I will be speaking on a panel.
Am I missing anything? Please send information regarding conferences and networking events (no shows/gigs) to me and I will add to the list. Contact me.

‪On Lil Nas X’s “Old Town Road” record-breaking chart success and the propensity of people to discredit the song as not being of good quality:‬

I am reading social media posts by old people (30yo plus) who assume that consumers care about music quality.

Guess what? They don’t.

We have entire genres of music born out of shitty quality (i.e. mumble rap) and entire genres going extinct as a result of apathy to music quality (i.e. soul).

The youth of today have their own standards for consumption. What matters to youth today is the social aspect of music — that is, how music creates a gateway to a sense of community. This has been going on for some time now, but the rise of social music apps and the growth of the first generation born with cell phones in their hands has exacerbated things.

Music quality need not be measurably “good” against songs we’ve historically deemed good and worthy of chart-topping recognition. For consumption in a streaming and social music era, music needs only to strike a chord with audiences that have the time and incentive to play it on repeat.

Charts, after all, are measurements of popularity and not quality. The latter is too subjective to measure anyway.

Music Industry Rant: ‘Rights’ Is Not A Buzzword

I think it is quite disingenuous and frankly misleading to slap on the term “rights” to every music tech platform that collects some minimum amount of metadata regarding musical works.

Music rights administration (including publishing and neighboring rights) is not a frivolous add-on to be used as a way to beef up one’s otherwise undifferentiated service offerings in an effort to attract customers in an ever more saturated music monetization and catalog management marketplace.

Music rights administration requires a comprehensive understanding of music publishing, copyright administration, licensing and multi-territorial relationships with CMOs, intermediaries, and administrators that goes well beyond delivering releases to DSPs or creating playlists to pitch to music supervisors. Understanding the nuances between royalty accounting and royalty forensics (not just parsing income statements), and having a grasp on the complicated music licensing and rights management ecosystem — not just direct deals — are bare minimum requirements for being a “rights” company.

Music rights administration requires knowledge, experience, and skill set that only comes from spending years doing nothing but this kind of work (it doesn’t hurt to have a masters degree specifically in music industry administration either); handling complicated issues around works registrations, disputes, and conflicts; combing over raw CWR and certain types of DDEX files; being in the room with the powers that be at CMOs and adjacent entities; and understanding how works are licensed and how income participants are accounted to in different territories under potentially overlapping representation mandates framed by international treaties (Berne, Rome, etc.) and bilateral agreements and supported by local copyright laws and termination terms.

In a word, slapping “rights” into the company tagline/description of a music tech platform that was founded to do anything but rights administration and for whom the founders have little to zero background and experience specifically in music rights administration is the new adding “decentralized” to data company descriptions.

Music industry people, be careful regarding the services that you sign up for. Your copyrights are the most important assets that you have. Putting the management, representation, or administration of these assets, for any period of time, in the wrong hands can and will lead to a world of trouble for you now and potentially for years to come.

Music industry colleagues, don’t let non music rights people abuse the term “music rights”. It isn’t a trendy phrase to add to your tagline to be current with everything that’s going on in the industry (e.g. MMA, MLC, CRB rulings, Article 13, etc.)

#MusicBusinessMonday: About Direct License ‘Black Box’ Royalties And Music Publishing Administrators

(Author’s Note 07/08/2019 10:33 AM PST: An industry associate of mine who is an independent music publishing industry leader and activist/advocate, as well as the owner of a small music publishing administration company, reached out to me to express his concern that my blog post paints all music publishing administrators in a bad light. He explained that entering into direct licenses is common practice for all publishers — including full-fledged publishers that own or co-own copyrights, as opposed to just handling administration like pub admins do — and not just pub admins. I know that. He felt that pub admins are being unfairly singled out in my blog post. As I explained to him, that is not my intent. I have many blog posts of opinions, analyses, criticisms, praises and reviews of many sectors and companies of the music industry. It is my role as a music creators’ rights advocate and watchdog, if you will, to raise awareness about these issues and practices, and educate music creators on their rights and business. This particular blog piece is not about small pub admin shops, like the one he operates, that has an overage of a few thousand dollars at the end of the year from direct deals, but rather the nature and effect of some of the large “catchall” pub admin services aggregating hundreds of thousands to millions of copyrights and the potential voluminous black boxes that direct licenses can accrue for their bottomline. These are some of the issues that we are asked about at TuneRegistry when speaking with songwriters who have or are considering switching to self-administration or to supplement the efforts of their existing large pub admin. Calling out provisions, or lack thereof, in contracts that songwiters may not be aware of, and which ultimately impacts their income, regardless of if it’s a small shop or goliath, is fair industry criticism. But, for clarity, this piece is in direct response to recent inquiries we’ve received at TuneRegistry regarding some of the popular catchall pub admin services on the market and not small pub admin businesses)

In this particular case, I get that he may take offense when the criticism may extend to parties that are not acting malicious — and I’m not saying that the big players are acting malicious anyway, but rather this issue is a fact of the deal that songwriters sign and should be aware of — and want to be presented in a fair light. So, to that end, I’ll update the post and my socials.

A music publishing administrator’s (“pub admins”) job is to register your musical works with CMOs/PROs/MROs in the territories for which you’ve hired them to represent your administration rights and to collect your royalties, prepare and remit income statements and payments to you. However, some pub admins go a step or two further and issue or enter into direct licensing agreements with companies on behalf of the compositions that it represents, such as direct performance licenses for startup social music apps or a blanket license for background music services.

The right to enter into direct licenses may be included in your contract with the pub admin. In this case, you will have explicitly granted the pub admin the right to license your songs, without asking permission per license, to third parties. In some direct deals, companies give advances or negotiate minimum guarantees to be paid to publishers. These advances and minimum guarantees are deducted from the actual earned royalties that are calculated from the usage of songs by the licensed service. However, in the event that there is an overage (meaning, the total volume of usage does not equal or exceed the advance or minimum guarantee) the difference between the overage and the actual earned royalties is the unallocated “black box” royalties.

It is important that these monies flow to the songwriters that the pub admin represent (less an appropriate commission) as the license fees were paid against the licensed catalog of songs, regardless of actual usage.

Surprisingly, although pub admins that ask songwriters to grant them the explicit right to direct license the songwriter’s songs, many pub admins do not have or do not communicate their policy for distributing unallocated “black box” royalties that stem from these direct licenses. And some cases, they just keep the black box royalties as miscellaneous income.

What’s in your contract? Talk you your pub admin about direct license black box royalties.

Statement By Dae Bogan On The Cancellation Of His ‘Music Industry Entrepreneurship’ UCLA Summer Class

Dear UCLA and non-UC Students who enrolled in my Summer 2019 Music Industry Entrepreneurship class:

Regrettably, my class, which was scheduled to begin this Thursday through UCLA Summer Sessions and UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music, has been cancelled. If you enrolled in the course, the school has already unenrolled you and you can find another course in the Music Industry program.

I decided to cancel the class due to low enrollment, which has impacted a number of classes this summer. Unlike my winter class, which is generally over enrolled with a wait list, summer has proven to be particularly difficult (Maybe students do not want to take class in the summer?).

My curriculum requires a significant amount of group work (60% of the grade) to be distributed across student group members as groups progress through the class as mock co-founders of a fictitious music industry startup business. Consequently, the class requires a minimum threshold of enrolled students to make the course dynamic enough to highlight the entrepreneurial principles, fundamental business strategies and music industry best practices that I teach.

While I hate that the class had to be cancelled with such short notice, I felt that to maintain the integrity of my curriculum and to ensure that student who get to take my class benefit from the way in which it was designed cancelling was the only option.

Student reviews of Dae Bogan’s Music Industry Entrepreneurship class:

Hi Dae, Just wanted to thank you for an awesome class. This was one of the few classes at UCLA where I felt I was taught skills, not just about the subject matter but in how to go about achieving my career goals, that were applicable to my endeavors and will be used for the rest of my life. I got more out of it than I had with any other course here and I would highly recommend your class to to anyone interested in a music industry career.

– Student testimonial, Winter Quarter 2019

Without a doubt one of the most useful classes I have taken in my undergraduate career at UCLA. Professor Bogan has so much real world knowledge and knows how to convey that knowledge in a classroom setting immensely well. All the course material was invaluable to my progression and aspirations of being in the music industry. Every lecture was extremely well-prepared, with amazing guest speakers and information that I will be using for the rest of my life. Professor Bogan did a phenomenal job and I will be recommending this class to all my friends interested in music or starting their own company. Can’t say enough good things about this class.

– Student testimonial, Winter Quarter 2018

If you are still interested in exploring entrepreneurship in the music industry, you may consider taking my online program Music Industry Entrepreneurship Masterclass which is a 4 hour sample of my full course. You can sign up for the masterclass at www.marcatoacademy.com.

[Video] Music Tech Investors and Incubators — Investing in the LA Music Tech Scenes

Last month I had the pleasure of curating and moderating the panel “Music Tech Investors and Incubators — Investing in the LA Music Tech Scenes” at the Amplifying Music in Our Los Angeles conference produced by the UCLA Center for Music Innovation.

My panelists included representatives of investors, accelerators and co-working communities in Los Angeles that focus on music industry entrepreneurship including Techstars Music, Capitol Music Group’s Capitol360 and gBeta Music Tech Accelerator, and The Rattle LA, as well as more open format accelerators including Expert Dojo and Startup UCLA & Blackstone Launch Pad.

In this <60 minutes discussion, we covered plenty of information that any founder of a music startup would want to know about where and how to seek resources to develop, launch, or grow a music venture in Los Angeles.

Bios of my speakers can be found below the video of the panel.

 

 

  • Moderator: Dae Bogan, Founder, TuneRegistry; Lecturer, UCLA Alpert
    Dae Bogan is a music rights executive, serial entrepreneur and educator with over a decade of experience in the music industry. He is the founder and CEO of TuneRegistry, which develops music rights administration software and solutions for small and medium-sized music rightsholders. He also offers music rights, business, and technology consulting through his firm, Rights Department. Dae also teaches the Music Industry Entrepreneurship course at UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music and was an Innovation Fellow at the UCLA Center for Music Innovation. Previously, Dae owned and operated an independent record company (Loft24 Records), a music publishing company (Loft24 Publishing), and an artist management company (Renaissance Artist Management) until 2012 when he founded an in-store independent music video network (Maven Promo), which was later acquired by EMPIRE Distribution in 2017. Dae also founded the world’s first aggregator and search engine of unclaimed music royalties (RoyaltyClaim), which was acquired by HAAWK in 2017.

 

  • Jonathan Wallace, Investment Director, Expert Dojo
    Jonathan Wallace joined Expert Dojo upon its inception as an investment analyst. Over the course of the next 3 years he established relationships with some of the largest venture capital funds in the world and helped dozens of startups raise investment. Jonathan is now the investment director for Expert Dojo and oversees all follow on investments. Expert Dojo has over 30 companies in its portfolio after investing for the last 12 months. 

 

  • Josh Remsberg, VP, Business Development, Capitol Music Group
    Josh Remsberg is Vice President of Business Development at Capitol Music Group. At Capitol, he oversees the Capitol360 Innovation Center, and is focused on finding & developing new revenue opportunities to exploit and extract value from CMG’s copyrights, content, brand assets, and artists. Josh also leads the eCommerce, CRM, audience ownership and gaming strategies for the label group.

 

  • Leah Nanni, Venture Coach and Outreach Coord., Startup UCLA & Blackstone Launch Pad
    Leah is a business owner and Venture Consultant at Startup UCLA, where she helps Bruins become confident and competent entrepreneurs. She also co-leads Startup UCLA’s outreach and inclusion efforts with the goal of reaching entrepreneurs at any stage, in any industry, and from any background and any area of study. Leah holds a M.S. in Social Entrepreneurship and a Master of Social Work, and she brings more than 9 years of business ownership experience to the UCLA and greater Los Angeles communities. 

 

  • Jen Hall, Director, TechStars Music
    Jen Hall is a music industry veteran having worked in management with major artists and at record labels over the past 15+ years. Jen joined Techstars with the inception of the Techstars Music program in 2016. Techstars Music has just finished its 3rd program. Alumni companies from the Techstars Music 2017 and 2018 class have gone on to raise over 50 million dollars in follow on capital.

 

  • Michael Frick, Advisor/Executive Producer, The Rattle, LA
    Michael Frick is a creative solutions innovator with the ability to build consensus among disparate stakeholders. His expertise in music driven strategies for brands, motion pictures, television and digital entertainment has seen him partner with numerous major global brands, agencies, networks and studios. As advisor to the Rattle he is assisting with the launch of the UK-based collective in Los Angeles, CA.
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