Archive | August 2018

What would a music streaming world look like without playlists?

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Artists, managers, labels, and the entire industry has shifted its obsession with radio programming to playlist curation; and in doing so has lost its collective respect for the craft of songwriting, the art of music production, and the deep connection that comes from a truly engaged and evangelical fan base.

Has the industry become so obsessed with virtual real estate (placement/positioning on playlists), metrics, and convoluted KPIs such as followers and saves that we’ve killed the spirit of why we do what we do?

Asking for 1 Million aspiring artist friends around the world who’ve yet to be jaded by what’s happening to our industry.

Let’s talk honestly about the culture and ethos of what we’re building in this great Digital Streaming Music Era…

Los Angeles Music Industry Upcoming Networking Events

daeboganmusic.com music events los angeles music industry

If you work in the music industry in Greater Los Angeles, here are a few upcoming must-attend networking events and communities to join (am I missing something? post in the comments).
• 8/27 – A2IM – Monthly Indie Mixer at Checker Hallhttps://www.eventbrite.com/e/la-a2im-monthly-indie-mixer-august-tickets-48614604591
• 8/28 – The California Copyright Conference – Summer Networking Mixer at Palihouse West Hollywoodhttps://theccc.org/events/summernetworkingmixer/
• 9/10 – Los Angeles Songwriters Collective at TeaPop – https://www.facebook.com/lasongwriters
• 11/8 – A2IM – SynchUp at Annenberg Community Beach Househttps://www.a2imsynchup.com/
Honorable mentions:
Industry Talks (curated by Kyle Emerson-Brown) – Just missed their Industry Talks Presents: Hear It Now, but more will be coming out of this camp so follow their page. Industry Talks connects amazing humans pursuing their passion in the music business. From label, management, press, legal and talent-buying executives to artists, writers and producers, Industry Talks is an extraordinary monthly evening of conversation and dinner. A positive environment through which we explore the current and future state of music, we foster support, connection, innovation and mobility. Discussion topics include management, artist rights and development, marketing, branding and tour promotion.
SoCal Music Industry Professionals (organized by Dae Bogan) – The last SCMIP’s Music Industry Happy Hour 10th Edition was an epic networking mixer at The Bungalow Santa Monica. Join the group to connect and network. SoCal Music Industry Professionals (SCMIP) is a networking group for Music Industry Professionals (MIPs) living in Southern California. The purpose of this group is to create spaces (online and offline) where current MIPs network, share and gain industry insights, develop and nurture new relationships, and simply be a part of a community of professionals.

Dae Bogan Included In Bobby Owsinski’s ‘The Music Business Advice Book: 150 Immediately Useful Tips from the Pros’

bobby owsinski dae bogan

Bobby Owsinski is one of the music industry’s greats. His ability to curate music industry knowledge into easy-to-ready texts across his over 20 books has helped thousands of music creators and music industry professionals in their careers. I’ve had the pleasure of being on Bobby’s podcast, Inner Circle, and participating on several music conference panels with Bobby. He is truly an inspiration. In fact, it was partially my participation in the making of his book “Music 4.0: A Survival Guide for Making Music in the Internet Age” that inspired me to write my first, very short, ebook “The DIY Musician’s Starter Guide To Being Your Own Label & Publisher.”

I am honored, once again, to have been included in Bobby’s latest book, “The Music Business Advice Book: 150 Immediately Useful Tips from the Pros,” available on Amazon.

About the book:

The music business can prove to be a difficult career road when you’re first starting out, but it can be traveled a lot easier with some helpful guidance from a pro who’s willing to share a few hard-earned hints. The Music Advice Book is a compilation of the pearls of experience from 130 top music pros from various segments of the industry who have previously shared their most important tips on Bobby Owsinski’s Inner Circle Podcast over the course of almost 5 years.

These 150 tips cover everything from following your passion, learning to network, and working well with your musical team, to owning your own content and even figuring out how much to charge for your services. Also included are even some useful music production words of wisdom, as well as the indispensable “10 Rules Of Networking.”

The insights in The Music Business Advice Book are essential for those new to the music industry but valuable to seasoned pros as well.

Another Music Modernization Act Opinion Piece

Some music industry executives believe that my position on many issues affecting music creators is too bullish. They dismiss my analyses as sensationalism. They believe, or are at least silent on the notion, that demanding the fair and equitable treatment of middle-class songwriters and recording artists should come with exceptions that disproportionately benefit corporations: major publishers and digital service providers.

But I am a copyright purist.

I believe that the authors of copyrighted musical works — songwriters — should have more say in the way in which their creations are valued and monetized in the marketplace. I do not believe in trickle-down economics or its promise that what’s best for the few at the top will benefit the majority at the bottom.

Greed disproves this all of the time.

Greed is asking songwriters to forgo the potential financial upside of bringing forward legitimate claims of past copyright infringement while simultaneously telling the songwriter community that monies that may become due to them could be redirected, by market share, to the few at the top who negotiated the preemptive dismissal of claims in the first place. Greed is telling artists to campaign for a piece of legislation that will reduce the number of entrants into the on-demand streaming market while simultaneously controlling/dominating the editorial opportunities of the DSP incumbents, greatly reducing opportunities that would otherwise be made available to emerging artists by startups that wish to partner with and elevate emerging artists.

I do believe that the Music Modernization Act will pass. I just hope that the decision-makers give some real thought to the millions of up-and-coming music creators who are not represented by the individuals who wrote the legislation that’ll change the way their copyrights will be exploited in the U.S.

What Can The Socioeconomic Context Of The Culture From Which Hip-Hop Is Derived Tell Us About How The Biggest Genre In The World Gets The Shitty End Of The Royalty Stick?

talib kweli

A young Talib Kweli on a New York City block as published on this Cuepoint article.

This piece is not meant to answer the question presented in its title, but rather to preface a discussion that should be, that needs to be, had in the music industry.
Streaming services are a beast that needs constant feeding. Younger hip-hop artists, already accustomed to providing sites such as SoundCloud with a constant stream of mixtapes and features, have adjusted to its demands more quickly than artists from other genres, and have thrived accordingly. At the heart of rap’s streaming dominance is something more ephemeral: Some songs just stream better than others, for reasons that no one can really explain yet. Hip-hop streams better than other types of mainstream music, and trap music streams better than other types of hip-hop. – The Washington Post (April, 2018)
R&B/hip-hop music was the year’s biggest genre, accounting for 24.5 percent of all music consumed….R&B/hip-hop genre represented 24.5 percent of all music consumption in the U.S. — the largest share of any genre and the first time R&B/hip-hop has led this measurement for a calendar year. (The 24.5 percent share represents a combination of album sales, track equivalent album units and streaming equivalent album units — including both on-demand audio and video streams.) — Billboard Magazine (January, 2018)
The statistic presents the number of on-demand music streams worldwide in 2016 and 2017, by genre. According to the source, the number of urban [Hip-Hop and R&B] on-demand streams rose from 55.9 billion in 2016 to 100.34 billion in 2017 – Statista (2018)

Most Hip-Hop and R&B artists do not have publishing representation. Therefore, a significant number of their digital music income streams fall into the unclaimed royalties (aka black box). After 3 years, those royalties can be forfeited to major publishers without the rapper kid from the block ever knowing he/she had money sitting on the table. Feeling so disenfranchised that you won’t even try (or know where to begin) to properly setup and unlock what is owed to you is part of the socioeconomic context from which much of this street music is derived.

This is part of the reason why I founded TuneRegistry and why I wrote the ebook “The DIY Musician’s Starter Guide To Being Your Own Label & Publisher” available for free download.

In a culture where access to institutional and compounding forms of wealth is but a dream and where living paycheck to paycheck is such a prevalent reality, how does this condition young Hip-Hop and R&B artists to be blinded to the ways in which their craft earns residual income? Let’s discuss in the comments.

Why More Pop Songwriters Are Stepping Into the Spotlight

I shared my thoughts on the status of income-earning for songwriters in today’s streaming landscape in this piece by Elias Leight for Rolling Stone:

“But regardless of whether you’re an upper-echelon songwriter living large or a middle-class one struggling to pay rent, the new system encourages writers to ‘think creatively about how to get more income streams,’ says Dae Bogan, Founder and CEO of the music-rights administration platform TuneRegistry.

If songwriters are indeed feeling the crunch, pushing for artist credit when possible is a natural response – it gives them access to money on the master’s side of recordings. Historically, “we get paid on publishing, the the words, the lyrics, the melody, the staff music written on a page,” explains Watt. “The master is the physical recording: Justin Bieber’s voice and DJ Snake’s production on ‘Let Me Love You.’ The master is where the money is. When a song is sold to a label, they buy the master. If the label gives that to an act, they make sure they own part of that master, otherwise in the streaming world, they’re not making any money.”

Now, Bogan says, “songwriters can say, I write hits; this is gonna be a hit for you; I want a piece of the master’s side.” That’s especially true if hit writers are in a position of leverage relative to the singer – “if it’s a young artist or an artist who’s been stagnant.”

This is in some sense a form of poetic justice for writers. “I used to manage songwriters, and we’d write for a number of artists who would demand that they get 10 percent of the publishing even though they didn’t write a single lyric,” Bogan says. “For decades, artists would dip into publishing to diversify their income stream. So now it’s like, let’s take that model and flip it on its head.”

Read the full article: https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-features/benny-blanco-eastside-pop-songwriter-credit-711061/

Should The Term ‘Urban Music’ Be Eradicated?

Is “urban music” nothing more than a modern colloquialism for the pre-1960’s term “colored music”? Some music industry figures despise the term because it generalizes a set of genres and the diversity of cultures associated with those genres and sub-genres. Furthermore, “urban music” suggests an affinity to racial, sociopolitical, and socioeconomic disenfranchisement that doesn’t translate or characterize the economics and consumption of the main genres encapsulated, or rather hindered, by the label “urban music” — that is, Hip-Hop and R&B are two of the most consumed streaming, radio, and live music genres in the world and many of the genres’ namesakes have no doubt released projects that would more fittingly be considered pop. Should the term “urban music” be eradicated?

Read this article written by Tim Ingham for Music Business Worldwide and let’s discuss in the comments.

SXSW 2019 Panel Voting Has Opened

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SXSW 2019 Panel Voting Has Opened. Please Vote For The Four (4) Panels That I Am On:

Becoming A Modern Music Entrepreneur

Description: Join successful music entrepreneurs to learn more about how a basic shift in perspective and the drive to work towards your goals is taking the first step to becoming a modern music entrepreneur.
Panelists: Dae Bogan (TuneRegistry), Brian Penick (The Counter Rhythm Group), Ariel Hyatt (Cyber PR), Einar Pedersen III (Austin Music Foundation)

Breaking Artists Through Video: Your How-To Guide

Description: For artists looking to break into the Hip-Hop game without the backing of a major label, the right music video could be their ticket to the main stage. Considering video is now the primary driver of revenue for new music releases, knowing how to maximize this medium will make or break your ability to build your brand. Join us as we talk about what it takes to create a video that people want to watch, promote a video that cuts through all the noise, and monetize a video that can make you rich.
Panelists: Dae Bogan (TuneRegistry), Roy LaManna (Vydia), Javier Sang (WorldstarHipHop), Yomi Desalu (BET)

Right On! – Real developments in rights technology

Description: Billions of lines of data are flowing between numerous systems and to a growing number of rights holders. Royalties need speedy and accurate processing across an evolving set of usage types and all on an increasingly global scale. Emerging rights management technologies offer the potential for a traditionally fragmented industry to become more cohesive and collaborative. So what will drive real development in rights technology that can handle all of this?
The issues surrounding rights management are compounded by the phenomenal growth of a data-heavy format combined with the industry’s historic difficulties in keeping pace with advancements in technology. It is of paramount importance that age old problems be addressed.
Panelists: Dae Bogan (TuneRegistry), Molly Meuman (Songtrust), Vickie Nauman (CrossBorderWorks Consulting & Advising), Anna Siegel (FUGA)

The Future of (meta)Data

2018 was the year that the word “data” got sexy in the music industry. 2019 will be the year that data will become the asset separating successful and less successful digital services. Music credits were an integral part of physical music…and they got lost along the way in the transition to digital. And in the case of performer and attribution data, lack of accurate information is the difference between being paid, or not. Our four panelists will cover the latest developments in the data world, from political and business decisions that impact payment of your money, to discussion of what is coming down the road in terms of artist discovery made possible by hyperlinked digital music credits. And we’ll cover the basics of making sure that proper metadata is associated with your music.
Panelists: Dae Bogan (TuneRegistry), Dick Huey (Jaxsta), Cherie Hu (Billboard), Vickie Nauman (CrossBorderWorks Consulting & Advising)
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