Tag Archive | hfa

So You Received A Notice From Music Reports Or Harry Fox Agency?

Earlier this week a number of artist managers in a Facebook group posted photos of letters that their clients received from Music Reports Inc. on behalf of Amazon. They asked what the notices meant and if they were legit.

I am sharing my post, which was shared to a number of other music industry groups:

In the last couple of days, several of you have posted about receiving a notice from Music Reports Inc. and questioned whether or not you should act on the letter.

Let me clarify what you’re receiving, why you’re receiving them, and what you should do about it.

The short answer: Unless your client is signed to a major music publisher or major indie (e.g. Kobalt) OPT IN TO ALL DIRECT LICENSES!

Who is sending these notices?

Music licensing clearing houses such as Music Reports Inc. and the Harry Fox Agency (via it’s service Rumblefish) are hired by digital music services (including the big ones like Amazon, Apple, and Spotify; as well as hundreds of small startups like what musically was but is now TikTok) to help the digital service to secure proper licenses (compulsory or direct) to use music in their service, to calculate royalties, and to make payments and remit statements to the proper copyright owners.

What are you receiving?

What you are receiving are opportunities to opt-in to a predetermined (generally nonnegotiable) direct license, alongside every other non-major / non-major-indie publisher in the world, to license your copyrights to a digital platform within the United States (sometimes the deal is worldwide, which can be problematic, but I don’t want complicate this post). There are also Section 115 NOIs, which goes out for every track released on a DSP for the US mechanical license for the underlying composition (this process is being disrupted by the Mechanical License Collective beginning Jan 1, 2021).

Why are you receiving the notice?

You’re receiving the notice because the agent has your information as the copyright owner (or authorized agent of the copyright owner) for copyrights (generally compositions) that have been matched to sound recordings that the digital service either already has or has access to. THIS IS A GOOD THING. This means that the digital service, via their agent’s (MRI, HFA, etc) database of song ownership information, knows who to pay once the copyright begins to earn royalties (or in the case of a one-time payment, they know who to pay from the pro rata advance pool). The flip side is if they do not have your ownership info, the copyright would not be properly licensed and the creators would not be paid — the royalties earned against their copyright would go into the so-called “black box” or the content will be blocked from the service altogether (e.g. notice that your music isn’t on or monetized on Facebook, Instagram, and Oculus?). Also, if the agent does not have your info for certain uses covered by Section 115 of the US Copyright Act, the notice is currently being remitted to the US Copyright Office.

How do you respond?

Review the license and decide if you want to opt-in or not. For most copyright owners, opting in is really your only shot at being licensed by the service. Up-and-coming artists are not going to be able to do a separate direct license with the service as the service has zero incentive to administer a separate agreement with you. They will do a deal with the major publishers and major-indie publishers and a unicorn artist here or there.

How to make sure that your contact information is readily available to these agents to ensure that they can contact you with licensing opportunities and have your payee info for royalties?

You can hire a pub admin (they’ll earn a 15% to 25% commission on all royalties collected) or you can do it yourself and keep 100% of your royalties in North America via TuneRegistry. See this article as an example of DIY.

Dae Bogan To Moderate Panel On Royalty Payments At Music Tectonics Conference

As music is more fluid across listening services, social music apps, and countries, royalties are more complex than ever. At Music Tectonics Conferece, experts from HFA, SynchTank, and Hyperwallet will unpack challenges and solutions, moderated by Dae Bogan, SVP of Global Music Rights at Jammber / TuneRegistry. Learn more at http://www.musictectonics.com

How To Get A Facebook, Instagram and Oculus Direct License For DIY Musicians & Indie Publishers

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Facebook has been undoubtedly one of the music industry’s biggest missed opportunity for monetization in recent years. With billions of users consuming millions of hours of video on Facebook and Instagram, which embodies sound recordings and compositions, the thought of Facebook rolling out monetization to independent songwriters and publishers makes us giddy!

Well, we are happy to report that that day has finally arrived! Read the story.

Dae Bogan To Speak At Copyright & Technology Conference – January 17 – New York, NY

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Conference Program

January 17, 2018

Fordham University School of Law, Lincoln Center Campus, New York, NY

Copyright and Technology NYC 2018 is the ninth annual one-day conference that focuses on the dramatic and fast-moving influences that technology has on copyright in the digital age. We are the unique forum where technologists, attorneys, media industry people, and public policy decision makers get together in the same room for intelligent dialog over current hot topics related to copyright and technology.

Copyright and Technology NYC 2018 will offer New York State CLE credit for afternoon panels.

1:15 – 2:15 pm

Match Game: The Problem of Matching Music Recordings to Compositions

The dramatic growth of streaming has exposed an Achilles’ Heel in the music industry: matching sound recordings to their underlying musical compositions.  Music services face challenges in determining which songwriters and music publishers they should pay royalties for the tracks they stream for their users. Accurate linking of sound recordings to compositions has proven problematic: it has led to controversies and lawsuits as well as opportunities for technological solutions. We’ll discover the state of the art in technology as well as industry-level attempts to solve this growing problem.

  • Moderator: Paul Jessop, Founder, County Analytics
  • Michael Simon, President, Rumblefish and CEO, Harry Fox Agency
  • John Mancini, Partner, Mayer Brown
  • Dae Bogan, Co-founder & CEO, TuneRegistry and Founder & Chief Researcher, Royalty Claim

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https://copyrightandtechconf.com/

Independent Artists: TuneRegistry Wants To Help You Register Your Music Rights

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After months of planning, we are finally excited to release additional information about TuneRegistry.

TuneRegistry is an easy-to-use and cost-effective solution to streamline music rights registrations and metadata delivery. We’re building TuneRegistry for the independent music community — to empower you with a powerful, yet simple, platform to manage your music catalog and associated rights administration all in one place.

TuneRegistry Screenshots

Who is TuneRegistry for?
From indie artists and artist managers to indie record labels and music publishers, we believe that the any music creator and rights owner within the independent music community will find value in TuneRegistry’s suite of tools and services. Even music attorneys like us!

We are currently seeking private beta testers from the independent music community. Request an invite.

Infograph: Understanding U.S. Music Royalties

The Music Business Association (Music Biz) published an infographic, “Music Royalties USA Quick Start Guide,” which gives songwriters and performing musicians a simple way to understand the complex framework they must navigate to receive proper payment for their work.

Click to enlarge and download.

Click to enlarge and download.

The document illustrates how royalties are handled for songwriters, publishers, and performers in various media, such as Physical Products and Download Sales, Radio & TV, Satellite & Cable Radio, Non-Interactive Streaming Radio, On-Demand Streaming Music Services, and Synchronization – Movies, TV, Games, Etc. The infographic also explains some of the more misunderstood jargon related to royalties and tells songwriters, publishers, and performers exactly which entities they need to register with.
“Because the rules governing music royalties are so complex and differ so greatly from one medium to another, many artists are leaving a significant amount of money on the table without even knowing it,” said Bill Wilson, Vice President of Digital Strategy and Business Development at Music Biz. “This infographic arms songwriters, publishers, and performers with the knowledge they need to ensure they get everything they are owed, allowing them to get back to what they do best: making music. We’d also like to thank our Affiliate Partners ASCAP, BMI, The Harry Fox Agency (HFA), The Recording Academy, SESAC, and SoundExchange, who all helped review the infographic to ensure it fully captured the process.”

The “Music Royalties USA Quick Start Guide” is the latest in a series of informational infographics that affirm Music Biz’s commitment to the artist community by providing vital information needed to understand how the music industry works and tips to get the most out of the services available to them. Previous entries include the “Global Music Licensing Quick Start Guide,” “SEO for Music Websites,” the “Artist Website Toolkit,” and more.

The infographic is available for free and can be viewed as a JPG or PDF.

Source: http://musicbiz.org/press-releases/music-biz-decodes-u-s-music-royalties-new-infographic/

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