Tag Archive | soundexchange

10 Income Streams For A Music Producer

A breakdown of income you could earn by producing one hit (or at least, viral) record.

Production Icome

1. Production fee for your creative input in producing the track.
2. Recording Engineer fee for performing recording engineer duties in the studio.
3. Mixing Engineer fee for mixing the track.
4. Mastering Engineer fee for mastering the track.

(1-4 could be embodied all in one fee, or you could line item it in your contract and/or invoice.)

Master Income

5. Income share in the master sales, downloads, streams, often referred to as “points on the record.”
6. If you add background vocals and/or live instrumentation to the production, while you may not earn a session musician fee, you are still entitled to receive all or a portion of the non-featured performer share of statutory master royalties for US non-interactive streams, or so-called “digital radio royalties.” To get this, make sure that you are credited not only as a Producer but also as a background vocalist or musician for whatever instrument you played. These royalties in the US are paid out by the AFM & SAG-AFTRA Intellectual Property Rights Distribution Fund. These funds do not reduce the featured artist’s neighboring rights (US = digital radio) income. It is completely separate from the featured performer share of income and non-negotiable by that featured performer. If you don’t claim it, you still earn it but you leave it on the table!
7. Thanks to the passing of the Music Modernization Act, which became law on October 11th, 2018, and the inclusion of the Allocation for Music Producers Act (AMP Act), studio professionals such as producers and engineers have a legal and permanent right to directly collect non-interactive, digital royalties agreed through a letter of direction with the featured artist from SoundExchange. Join the Creative Affiliates Program at SoundExchange and submit your letters of direction.
8. A producer’s share of international neighboring rights royalties in several territories where recordings that you produce are performed on broadcast radio and TV.

Publishing Income

9. If you composed the melody or co-authored the lyrics, you should be considered a Writer on the musical work and be entitled to receive writer-share of publishing income (performance royalties, mechanical royalties, synchronization royalties).
10. If you composed the melody or co-authored the lyrics, as a Writer on the musical work, you are entitled to receive or assign the publisher-share of publishing income (performance royalties, mechanical royalties, synchronization royalties).

In conclusion, if you’re a music producer, make sure that you understand all of the income streams associated with the work that you put in on a recording AND your legal entitlements under copyright law and music publishing industry customs. Also, join the Recording Academy / GRAMMYs Producers & Engineers Wing.

Want to learn more? Download my FREE ebook “The DIY Musician’s Starter Guide To Being Your Own Label And Publisher.”

Royalty Claim Pre-launch Is Just 7 Days Away!

Unclaimed Royalties Database

The Royalty Claim researchers and data scientists (aka “nerds”) are racing against the clock to finalize the processing of several million remaining records of unclaimed royalties and music licenses so that you and thousands of music creators and rights-holders like you can search and find potential entitlements.

Plainly, we’re trying to get you paid!

With an estimated over $2.5bn in unclaimed royalties sitting on the YUGE greater music industry table, there is no better time to shine a light on the inefficient royalty payment ecosystem than now. Royalty Claim’s Unclaimed Royalties database currently has tens of thousands of payees (individuals and entities) to which royalties are due (from Pandora, SiruisXM, Music Choice, iHeartRadio, and over 2,000 other webcasters, digital radio platforms, and foreign companies). If you’ve ever had music on digital (Internet, satellite, cable, retail music transmission), you may have royalties waiting for you.

We are happy to announce that, with the assistance of our cousin company TuneRegistry,  rights administrators such as Harry Fox Agency(represents Spotify, Apple, Napster f/k/a Rhapsody, The Orchard and 7Digital), Music Reports Inc. (represents Amazon, Microsoft and iHeart Media), and Loudr (represents CD Baby and Distrokid) have come on-board to cooperate with our Section 115 NOI claiming process and help match over 40 million outstanding NOIs with copyright owners. (In simple terms, when a copyright owner finds a Notice of Intention in Royalty Claim and completes the claim process, they may unlock back royalties owed to the copyright owner by digital music services and open the flow of future royalties.)

SO, WHAT’S NEXT?

Royalty Claim will pre-launch on August 10th. This is for anyone who pre-registered at www.royaltyclaim.com/comingsoon.

Those who’ve pre-registered will be able to secure a Life-time Standard Subscription to Royalty Claim for only $150 (in comparison, a monthly Standard subscription is $15 per month or $180 per year). You will receive an email the morning of August 10th with instructions on how to obtain this limited offer.

Royalty Claim’s official launch will be on September 1st. At that point, anyone can join for FREE or choose any of the premium plans on http://www.royaltyclaim.com.

Please spread the world. Our official hashtag is #UnlockMyRoyalties

Tweet and Post: So excited for the launch of @RoyaltyClaim and access to over 40 MILLION records of unclaimed music royalties & licenses. #UnlockMyRoyalties

 

Learn More

 

Upcoming Event in Los Angeles

Royalty Claim’s Founder & Chief Researcher, Dae Bogan, will be presenting our The State of Unclaimed Royalties & Music Licenses report on Friday, August 11th at the Music Industry Research Association’s MIRA Conference at the University of California, Los Angeles. Details at www.themira.org

 

How To Auction Off Your Future Royalties When You’re A Back-up Singer Or Session Music

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Photo by Jason Rosewell on Unsplash

It is very important for background vocalists (and artists who provide background vocals on the side) to understand that they earn money BEYOND the studio session in which they performed. Billboard published an article on how a back-up singer on Wiz Khalifa’s “See You Again” featuring Charlie Puth put up 100% of his U.S. digital performer royalties for auction on Royalty Exchange with bids starting at $30,000. These royalties are collected by SoundExchange and administered by AFM & SAG-AFTRA Intellectual Property Rights Distribution Fund.

This is a great example of how a background vocalist can leverage his/her equity in a hit song to get paid big bucks, today! This also applies to session musicians.

#MusicBusinessMonday: Session Musicians

Royalty Claim has thousands of records of unclaimed royalties due to non-featured performers (session musicians, background vocalists, etc.) from recordings performed on digital radio (e.g. Pandora, Music Choice, iHeartRadio, SiriusXM, and more). Royalty Claim also provides data on ‘address unknown’ NOIs filed under the Section 115 compulsory mechanical license for services such as Amazon, Spotify, Apple, Google, and many others.

Read more about the auctioning your future royalties in the Billboard story here.

Learn more about Royalty Claim at http://www.royaltyclaim.com. Royalty Claim will pre-launch on August 10th. This is for anyone who pre-registered at www.royaltyclaim.com/comingsoon. Those who’ve pre-registered will be able to secure a life-time subscription to Royalty Claim for only $150. Royalty Claim official launch will be September 1st. At that point, anyone can join for free or choose any of the premium plans.

#MusicBusinessMonday: Music Producers

04-04-2016 - Music Producers Header

Music Producers: You’re often the underdog in the royalty fight. Although the Recording Academy’s Producers & Engineers Wing is pushing for an amendment to the U.S. Copyright Act that would provide an allocation of non-interactive digital streaming royalties (SoundExchange royalties) to producers, no laws currently stipulate that you must receive sound recording royalties from your work when Pandora, SiriusXM, Music Choice, Slacker, iHeart Radio, or any of the other 2,500 digital services perform music that you produced (however, producers can receive publishing income if you’re a “writer” on the song).

So, what’s the solution? How do you make more money from your works when retail record sales royalties are becoming a myth?

Read More…

Independent Artists: TuneRegistry Wants To Help You Register Your Music Rights

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After months of planning, we are finally excited to release additional information about TuneRegistry.

TuneRegistry is an easy-to-use and cost-effective solution to streamline music rights registrations and metadata delivery. We’re building TuneRegistry for the independent music community — to empower you with a powerful, yet simple, platform to manage your music catalog and associated rights administration all in one place.

TuneRegistry Screenshots

Who is TuneRegistry for?
From indie artists and artist managers to indie record labels and music publishers, we believe that the any music creator and rights owner within the independent music community will find value in TuneRegistry’s suite of tools and services. Even music attorneys like us!

We are currently seeking private beta testers from the independent music community. Request an invite.

Infograph: Understanding U.S. Music Royalties

The Music Business Association (Music Biz) published an infographic, “Music Royalties USA Quick Start Guide,” which gives songwriters and performing musicians a simple way to understand the complex framework they must navigate to receive proper payment for their work.

Click to enlarge and download.

Click to enlarge and download.

The document illustrates how royalties are handled for songwriters, publishers, and performers in various media, such as Physical Products and Download Sales, Radio & TV, Satellite & Cable Radio, Non-Interactive Streaming Radio, On-Demand Streaming Music Services, and Synchronization – Movies, TV, Games, Etc. The infographic also explains some of the more misunderstood jargon related to royalties and tells songwriters, publishers, and performers exactly which entities they need to register with.
“Because the rules governing music royalties are so complex and differ so greatly from one medium to another, many artists are leaving a significant amount of money on the table without even knowing it,” said Bill Wilson, Vice President of Digital Strategy and Business Development at Music Biz. “This infographic arms songwriters, publishers, and performers with the knowledge they need to ensure they get everything they are owed, allowing them to get back to what they do best: making music. We’d also like to thank our Affiliate Partners ASCAP, BMI, The Harry Fox Agency (HFA), The Recording Academy, SESAC, and SoundExchange, who all helped review the infographic to ensure it fully captured the process.”

The “Music Royalties USA Quick Start Guide” is the latest in a series of informational infographics that affirm Music Biz’s commitment to the artist community by providing vital information needed to understand how the music industry works and tips to get the most out of the services available to them. Previous entries include the “Global Music Licensing Quick Start Guide,” “SEO for Music Websites,” the “Artist Website Toolkit,” and more.

The infographic is available for free and can be viewed as a JPG or PDF.

Source: http://musicbiz.org/press-releases/music-biz-decodes-u-s-music-royalties-new-infographic/

Demystifying The Music Industry: What’s The Difference Between ASCAP/BMI/SESAC and SoundExchange?

I received an email this morning from a reader who had read my piece, “Demystifying The Music Industry: What’s This About Public Performance Rights?.” He asked, “If SoundExchange was designated by the Library of Congress as the sole PRO to administer public performance licenses and also collect public performances fees for Sound Recording Company Owners, then why do artists still utilize the services provided by the other 3 US PROs (ASCAP / BMI / SESAC) – is [SoundExchange] not sufficient by itself?”

A lot of indie artists are confused about the difference between ASCAP, BMI, SESAC and SoundExchange. I’ll attempt to break down the most important differences between these groups and elaborate towards the end about other considerations and other royalty collection entities. Feel free to comment with any questions (or corrections).  Read More…

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