Tag Archive | tuneregistry

Dae Bogan To Speak At A3C Conference

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I look forward to joining Marcus Cobb at this year’s A3C Conference to present “Ownership & Song Registration in the Palm of Your Hand” on Saturday, October 12th, at 2:30pm.

Presentation Description: In this digital age of music, songs have the ability to go from conception to the public in the blink of an eye. Within this new age, it has never been as vital to establish ownership and collect metadata as it is today. In short, your money depends on it! Learn how Jammber’s game-changing technology puts ownership and song registration in the palm of your hand.

***Earlier this month, Jammber announced its acquisition of TuneRegistry. The story was covered in Music Business Worldwide, Billboard, Music Connection, Digital Music News, Hypebot, and others.*** 

Breaking: Jammber Acquires TuneRegistry

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I am super excited about this!

I’ve been a fan of Marcus and Jammber, and they of me/TuneRegistry, since I first learned of Jammber. Over the last few years, TuneRegistry has been empowering thousands of songwriters, artists, and publishers while Jammber has been empowering producers, engineers, studios and labels. By bringing our expertise and resources together, we believe to have established the first economical end-to-end music business platform for music creations and workflow management, rights administration, and royalty processing for all music creators and rights-holders.

In the coming months, we will be working to integrate TuneRegistry into the Jammber product suite as well as beefing up the Los Angeles-based music rights administration department under my direction as Jammber’s Senior Vice President, Global Music Rights. I look forward to continuing to empower music creators and rights-holders with effective tools and resources to self-administer their catalogs via Jammber’s suite of products.

Here’s a few press links:
 

Why I Founded TuneRegistry

When I managed artists, I made this “Song Processing Checklist” to keep track of everywhere that I was aware of to register my artists’ music. It was daunting. TuneRegistry simplifies this.

Nearly 10 years ago I founded my first music company. It was called Renaissance Artist Management (RAM Artist) and I managed DJs who I had for several years prior booked often to play club events that I produced while in undergrad at UCLA. Some of these DJs were also aspiring music producers, so later I launched Loft24 Records and Loft24 Publishing to help them collaborate with artists and topliners. I picked name Loft24 because I was 24 years old and I lived in a loft in Downtown Los Angeles, which had been a goal of mine since my youth (I have no idea why). I had also signed my first two live acts – a singer/songwriter and a rapper/songwriter — after producing a multi-city mall talent search tour for Reebok…they were the winners.

Prior to founding RAM Artist, Loft24 Records, and Loft24 Publishing, I had some music business exposure having grew up in a multi-generational music family and having been an aspiring musician myself, but my knowledge was nowhere near as expansive as it is today (insert a lot of self-teaching and an eventual masters degree in music business).

One of the things I was really good at as a manager and music entrepreneur was creating systems and processes to make workflows efficient. This was necessary considering all of the tasks I had to juggle as an artist manager, label owner, and music publisher. And I had a daytime job as VP of Marketing & Partnerships of a youth-targeted retail chain and founder/GM of its music division.

I had previously built database-driven e-commerce systems at two companies where I had worked in marketing; and with a history of event production, I was generally a very logistical and process-oriented person.

At the time that I was managing artists, DJs, producers, songwriters and marketing music, I was unaware of software that would make my life easier in these administrative tasks. So, I built my own.

I had previously developed a checklist of everywhere that I was aware of where my client’s music needed to be registered before it was released. I used this “Song Processing Checklist” for every work in our catalog. I’d manually login to ASCAP and the Copyright Office systems to register works and record confirmation numbers. It was daunting!

To pitch our catalog, I built an internal platform called “Music Licensing Portal” (basically an early version of what DISCO or SourceAudio is today). I’d invite music supervisors to search our catalog and initiate sync license requests.

Then I built what would be my first music tech startup, SongBank, a marketplace where A&R’s could shop for unpublished songs using an audio fingerprint of a reference songs. SongBank was described as a robust cloud-based project management platform developed specifically for songwriters and record label A&Rs (I’m still unaware of anything like it on the market). I wanted to help undiscovered songwriters get placements on major label projects after my experience pitching my writers to A&Rs. I had brought on advisers who were A&Rs or VP of A&R at Hollywood Records, Island Def Jam Music Group, Roc Nation, and Atlantic Records. I later stopped working on SongBank to launch Maven Promo (formerly ChazBo Music), which is an in-store independent music video network, which I sold to EMPIRE Distribution last year to fund the development and launch of RoyaltyClaim, the world’s first search engine of unclaimed music royalties, which I later sold to Haawk Inc and then to Made In Memphis Entertainment this year.

All of this leads me to this: TuneRegistry.

TuneRegistry is a software like no other. I conceptualized it based on all of the above experience (although I had been working on it prior to RoyaltyClaim). What started as a Word Doc checklist of places to register my client’s songs has evolved into a robust software to streamline the process of registering works across rights organizations, delivering music metadata across the music industry, the management of disputes and conflicts, and the insurance of royalty accountability, all in one place.

We had a setback for a few months, when I had to buy the company back from a company that had acquired it in 2017, but will be launching an new and improved platform on October 1st and I can’t wait

(Photos below are of the tools and platforms that I referenced above. I built these in my early twenties to operate my music companies and manage my clients’ careers more efficiently.)

My Thoughts On The MMA In Light Of The CRB Mechanical License Rate Decision

In light of the CRB’s ruling today to increase mechancial royalty rates for on-demand DSPs, I would caution against passing the Music Modernization Act without first amending it to include some very necessary guarantees for DIY musicians.

Given the recent ruling to increase mechanical rates, penalize DSPs for late payments, and remove the TCC cap DSPs will be more incentivized to cling to the safe harbor components of the MMA to limit their financial responsibility to songwriters.

I also fear that the blanket license (combined with the elimination of the statutory damages provision against infringement) would hurt more DIY musicians than protect compared to the existing compulsory licensing schema where today an independent can fully self-administer his/her mechancial rights via a service like TuneRegistry or with a third-party administrator like Songtrust. Why? Because the unclaimed/unpaid (aka “black box”) royalty fund will also increase by 44%, giving major publishers a bigger windfall of market share distributed gains from a royalty pool that generally belongs to unidentified independent songwriters.

What incentive does DSPs, who must pay the rates anyway, and major publishers, who will undoubtedly control the mechanical licensing collective body, have to ensure the works of DIY musicians are properly represented and accounted to and what power do DIY musicians have to assert their limited rights?

I could be completely and utterly wrong.

However, the devil is in the details and the MMA, while it does streamline the process of mechancial licensing in the United States for DSPs it also effectively limits the warranties and representations of DIY musicians.

Every article written about MMA is generally written from the perspective of publishers and NMPA members. As an advocate for and service provider to DIY musicians, my perspective is a bit different and more nuanced.

The decision today by the CRB was a win for all songwriters. The MMA is a win for major publishers. It must be amended.

[Podcast] Copyright Clearance Center Adds Recording Of “View From The Top: The Future Of Machine-To-Machine Rights Management” Panel Discussion From RightsTech Summit 2017 To Its Beyond The Book Podcast

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“View From The Top: The Future Of Machine-To-Machine Rights Management” panel at RightsTech Summit in New York

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Left to Right: Dae Bogan (CEO, TuneRegistry), Benji Rogers (CEO, dotBlockchain Music), Michael S. Simon (President of Rumblefish & CEO of Harry Fox Agency), Michael Shanley (Vice President of IT Business Development, Music Reports)

Machine-to-machine communication is the ideal scenario if we want to enable on a global scale, with as little friction as possible and at a reasonable cost, the licensing of works and the payment of royalties to rightsholders.  That at least is the stated premise for a recent discussion at the annual RightsTech Summit conference.

But how far have we come?  How close are we to achieving a digitized business environment for rights and royalties that is as fully realized as we see today in media distribution and consumption? Until code entirely does away with contracts will human beings will continue to add a value that no machine ever can?

“I think all of this starts with a human being. No matter what technology we apply to these systems, if a person doesn’t know how to interact or create the data that they need to disseminate, it’s just not going to get there,” said Michael Shanley of Music Reports. Technology evolves all the time, and I think we’re getting to great places in technology.  But education and information is, I think, paramount.”

Panelists for the session moderated by CCC’s Chris Kenneally included Dae Bogan co-founder & CEO of TuneRegistry, a music and rights metadata management platform; Benji Rogers, a British-born, New York-based entrepreneur, who co-founded the Dot Blockchain Music Project, an attempt to create a de-centralized global registry of music rights using blockchain technology; Michael S. Simon, President of Rumblefish, a world leader in music micro-licensing and YouTube monetization and also CEO of the Harry Fox Agency LLC, the nation’s leading provider of rights management, licensing and royalty services for the music industry; and Michael Shanley, Vice President of IT Business Development at Music Reports, developers of proprietary databases and software applications that facilitate music rights administration.

Listen here.

podcast

Dae Bogan To Speak At RightsTech Summit – September 17 – New York, NY

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RightsTech Summit – September 17 – New York, NY http://rightstechsummit.com/

VIEW FROM THE TOP: THE FUTURE OF MACHINE-TO-MACHINE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT

If licensing and royalty payments are ever to be managed with the same machine-to-machine efficiency as media distribution and consumption, rights information must be put into machine-readable formats. A panel of senior executives from across media sectors to discuss the status of various initiatives to get rights information into machine-readable form, the challenges they’re facing, and how close or far we are from reliable machine-to-machine rights clearances.

PANELISTS:
Dae Bogan, Co-founder and CEO, TuneRegistry
Christopher Kenneally, Director, Business Development, Copyright Clearance Center
Benji Rogers, CEO, dotblockchain Music
Michael Shanley, Vice President of IT Business Development, Music Reports
Michael Simon, President & CEO, Rumblefish
MODERATOR: Christopher Kenneally, Copyright Clearance Center

Dae Bogan To Speak At Copyright & Technology Conference – January 17 – New York, NY

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Conference Program

January 17, 2018

Fordham University School of Law, Lincoln Center Campus, New York, NY

Copyright and Technology NYC 2018 is the ninth annual one-day conference that focuses on the dramatic and fast-moving influences that technology has on copyright in the digital age. We are the unique forum where technologists, attorneys, media industry people, and public policy decision makers get together in the same room for intelligent dialog over current hot topics related to copyright and technology.

Copyright and Technology NYC 2018 will offer New York State CLE credit for afternoon panels.

1:15 – 2:15 pm

Match Game: The Problem of Matching Music Recordings to Compositions

The dramatic growth of streaming has exposed an Achilles’ Heel in the music industry: matching sound recordings to their underlying musical compositions.  Music services face challenges in determining which songwriters and music publishers they should pay royalties for the tracks they stream for their users. Accurate linking of sound recordings to compositions has proven problematic: it has led to controversies and lawsuits as well as opportunities for technological solutions. We’ll discover the state of the art in technology as well as industry-level attempts to solve this growing problem.

  • Moderator: Paul Jessop, Founder, County Analytics
  • Michael Simon, President, Rumblefish and CEO, Harry Fox Agency
  • John Mancini, Partner, Mayer Brown
  • Dae Bogan, Co-founder & CEO, TuneRegistry and Founder & Chief Researcher, Royalty Claim

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https://copyrightandtechconf.com/

Eron Bucciarelli (Soundstr), Dae Bogan (TuneRegistry & Royalty Claim), Benji Rogers (DotblockchainMedia & Pledge Music), and Jason Trikakis (HelloSugoi) Submit ‘How Tech Can Save the Music Industry’ Panel for SXSW 2018 – How To Vote Details

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I’m excited to join fellow music tech founders Eron Bucciarelli (Soundstr), Benji Rogers (DotblockchainMedia), and Jason Trikakis (HelloSugoi) for a panel submission to SXSW 2018. Please vote and share the submission for “How Tech Can Save the Music Industry” #MusicTransparency

How Tech Can Save the Music Industry

The music industry is in dire need of change not only to thrive, but survive. Streaming, pirating and the secondary ticket market have dealt serious blows to our industry’s major revenue streams, but technology can be our savior. Join experts from the royalty, rights, ticketing and metadata blockchain sectors to learn not only how tech can provide short-term solutions, but also build a more sustainable industry. Join us to learn how tech can save the music industry. #MusicTransparency

QUESTIONS

  1. What are the current and near-future major issues of the industry that could be disrupted by technology?
  2. What solutions can tech offer and how can they be practically applied to our everyday lives?
  3. What is the long-term impact of these tech solutions? What happens without these solutions based on the current landscape of our industry?

SPEAKERS

CLICK HERE TO VOTE

 

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